Author Archives: lynne

About lynne

I am an Honorary Researcher at LaTrobe University. I am the author of 17 books, the most recent being 'Spiders: learning to love them' (Allen & Unwin), 'Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies' (Cambridge University Press, and 'The Memory Code' (Allen & Unwin, AUS; Pegasus Books, US and Atlantic Books, UK). I am currently writing a companion book (but can be read quite independently) to 'The Memory Code' about how to apply the indigenous memory methods - and many more - in contemporary life.

The Memory Code in Czech (and a new tag)

I am delighted to announce that The Memory Code is now available in Czech – alongside the English and Chinese editions. Click on the image for the link to this site where there are more details. If I could read … Continue reading

Posted in The Memory Code, The Memory Whisperer | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Talks about ‘The Memory Code’

I have been rather quiet on this blog recently as I finished the new book (still without a title!) and am working with my editor on final changes and the images. I am very nervous about my art work appearing … Continue reading

Posted in Australian Institute of Archaeology, The Memory Code, The Memory Whisperer, The Skeptic's Guide to the Paranormal | 2 Comments

The Memory Code – In Chinese

I am delighted to announce that The Memory Code is now available in Chinese. I have only started learning the language, so I can’t read what this says, but I am really chuffed to see this Good Publishing Co edition. … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, memory, memory devices, memory palace, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mnemonic devices, mnemonics, Neolithic, orality, Orkney, prehistory, primary orality, songlines, stone circles, Stonehenge, The Memory Code | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Fascinating wooden charts of the Tunumiit

So much of my work is about the incredible potential of hand held memory devices. These carved maps of the Tunumiit culture of Greenland combine the two methods I use most: the landscape and handheld devices. How logical is it to … Continue reading

Posted in Inuit, memory, memory devices, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mnemonic devices, The Memory Code | 6 Comments

Jim Rountree really understands my ideas

There have been lots of articles about The Memory Code. Lots of interviews and lots of talks. I was reflecting back on the past eighteen months as I head into the final stages of preparing the manuscript for the next … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, art of memory, memory, memory devices, memory palace, memory places, method of loci, mnemonic devices, songlines, Stonehenge, The Memory Code | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Memory workshops and Mnemonic Arts classes

There is a one day workshop on Saturday April 7th. There are also mnemonic arts classes for school students. All takes places at the new Orality Centre offices. For more information, click on the images and you will head off … Continue reading

Posted in Alice Steel, art of memory, indigenous memory systems, lukasa, memory, memory board, memory devices, memory palace, method of loci, mnemonic devices, mnemonics, Orality Centre, Paul Allen, primary orality, The Memory Code | Leave a comment

Memory methods of the Inuit and Yao

I get the most amazing emails from readers of The Memory Code. I wish I was more diligent in sharing them here. This week brought in a fascinating reference to the wooden carved maps which were used by various Inuit … Continue reading

Posted in Inuit, memory, memory devices, mnemonic devices, orality, The Memory Code, Yao | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why absolutely everywhere needs a name

And I mean everywhere. And I mean a memorable, useful name. When setting up a memory palace, name every location carefully and it will serve you well. That is a lesson from indigenous cultures that I had not learned well enough. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments

Avebury Henge, looking more gorgeous than ever

I get wonderful emails from readers of The Memory Code. One of them not only talked about one of my favourite places in the world – Avebury Henge in Wiltshire – but included the best photos I have ever seen … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Avebury, British Neolithic, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, stone circles, The Memory Code | Tagged , | Leave a comment