Category Archives: archaeologists

Stonehenge – they moved their memory palace from Wales!

Thank you to the many people who sent me links to the various reports of this discovery and commented on how wonderfully it suited my theory on the purpose of Stonehenge. “Stonehenge was a Welsh monument from its very beginning. … Continue reading

Posted in archaeologists, archaeology, art of memory, Australian Aboriginal, British Neolithic, Cambridge University Press, indigenous memory systems, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, memory devices, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mnemonics, songlines, Stonehenge | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Knowledge, Power and Stonehenge

This blog is a response to questions from archaeologists from a talk I gave on Thursday. I addressed a crowd of over 200 at the Castlemaine Library on the topic of “Knowledge, Power and Stonehenge” based on my book. There were a … Continue reading

Posted in archaeologists, archaeology, Durrington Walls, memory, method of loci, post circles, Poverty Point, prehistory, stone circles, Stonehenge | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Orality – why it is so important for prehistoric archaeologists

Primary orality is what you have when you don’t have literacy. It is often commented that prehistoric cultures didn’t leave a written record. What is almost never mentioned is that cultures which had no contact with writing did have an alternative. They had … Continue reading

Posted in archaeologists, archaeology, Australian Aboriginal, indigenous memory systems, lukasa, memory, Memory Spaces, mnemonics, mythology, orality, prehistory, primary orality, Yolngu | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A conspiracy of archaeologists? I don’t think so.

Is this stone final proof of a world wide prehistoric culture? Apparently there is an established archaeological community which ignores the results. I simply can’t believe in a world wide conspiracy of archaeologists who oppose new ideas. I have good evidence that there … Continue reading

Posted in archaeologists, archaeology, conspiracy theories, memory, Memory Spaces, mnemonics, orality | 2 Comments