Category Archives: The Memory Code

Art as a memory device

I get the most wonderful emails from readers. This one particularly delighted me because of the stunning painting attached. How good is that?!? There are more of Eric Wert’s paintings on his website. Eric wrote (quoted with permission): “I recently … Continue reading

Posted in art, memory, Memory Craft, memory methods, memory palace, mnemonic devices, The Memory Code | Tagged | 2 Comments

Adding layers to a memory palace & The Eastern Curlew

I had a lovely time at the Stories of Influence writers’ festival at Lake Tyers in Gippsland, Victoria. With indigenous and non-indigenous participants, the role of story and art in all sorts of cultures dominated the weekend’s activities. After delivering … Continue reading

Posted in Eastern Curlew, Harry Saddler, lukasa, memory board, Memory Craft, memory palace, mnemonic devices, The Memory Code, The Memory Whisperer | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Spanish “Stonehenge”

There are so many sites nicknamed with the tag “Stonehenge” that I have not had time to explore them all. When the “Spanish Stonehenge” hit the news in recent weeks, I was pointed to the reports by many readers of … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Dolmen de Guadalperal, indigenous memory systems, memory, Memory Craft, memory methods, memory palace, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mythology, Neolithic, Spanish Stonehenge, stone circles, The Memory Code, The Memory Whisperer | 2 Comments

The Memory Code in Czech (and a new tag)

I am delighted to announce that The Memory Code is now available in Czech – alongside the English and Chinese editions. Click on the image for the link to this site where there are more details. If I could read … Continue reading

Posted in The Memory Code, The Memory Whisperer | Tagged , | 7 Comments

Talks about ‘The Memory Code’

I have been rather quiet on this blog recently as I finished the new book (still without a title!) and am working with my editor on final changes and the images. I am very nervous about my art work appearing … Continue reading

Posted in Australian Institute of Archaeology, The Memory Code, The Memory Whisperer, The Skeptic's Guide to the Paranormal | 2 Comments

The Memory Code – In Chinese

I am delighted to announce that The Memory Code is now available in Chinese. I have only started learning the language, so I can’t read what this says, but I am really chuffed to see this Good Publishing Co edition. … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, memory, memory devices, memory palace, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mnemonic devices, mnemonics, Neolithic, orality, Orkney, prehistory, primary orality, songlines, stone circles, Stonehenge, The Memory Code | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Fascinating wooden charts of the Tunumiit

So much of my work is about the incredible potential of hand held memory devices. These carved maps of the Tunumiit culture of Greenland combine the two methods I use most: the landscape and handheld devices. How logical is it to … Continue reading

Posted in Inuit, memory, memory devices, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mnemonic devices, The Memory Code | 6 Comments

Jim Rountree really understands my ideas

There have been lots of articles about The Memory Code. Lots of interviews and lots of talks. I was reflecting back on the past eighteen months as I head into the final stages of preparing the manuscript for the next … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, art of memory, memory, memory devices, memory palace, memory places, method of loci, mnemonic devices, songlines, Stonehenge, The Memory Code | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

Memory workshops and Mnemonic Arts classes

There is a one day workshop on Saturday April 7th. There are also mnemonic arts classes for school students. All takes places at the new Orality Centre offices. For more information, click on the images and you will head off … Continue reading

Posted in Alice Steel, art of memory, indigenous memory systems, lukasa, memory, memory board, memory devices, memory palace, method of loci, mnemonic devices, mnemonics, Orality Centre, Paul Allen, primary orality, The Memory Code | Leave a comment