Category Archives: archaeology

The advance copies arrive

The wonderful moment when I first hold the book which represents years of obsessive pleasure. Thank you to LaTrobe University, my PhD supervisor Professor Sue Martin, Cambridge University Press, family, friends and most of all, my husband, Damian. All that … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Cambridge University Press, carved stone balls, indigenous memory systems, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, memory, mnemonics, Poverty Point, primary orality, stone circles, Stonehenge, writing non-fiction | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Primary orality and portable objects

I am presenting a paper, Primary orality and portable objects, at the Archaeology of Portable Art conference at the Australian National University in Canberra, 23rd – 24th May 2015. The program looks fantastic – Click on the above image or here. I’ll … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Australian Aboriginal, carved stone balls, indigenous memory systems, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, Memory Spaces, mnemonics, orality, primary orality, Stonehenge | Tagged | 2 Comments

Orality – why it is so important for prehistoric archaeologists

Primary orality is what you have when you don’t have literacy. It is often commented that prehistoric cultures didn’t leave a written record. What is almost never mentioned is that cultures which had no contact with writing did have an alternative. They had … Continue reading

Posted in archaeologists, archaeology, Australian Aboriginal, indigenous memory systems, lukasa, memory, Memory Spaces, mnemonics, mythology, orality, prehistory, primary orality, Yolngu | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

English Heritage interactive map of Stonehenge

Stonehenge absolutely fascinates me. Why did they build it? Stonehenge changed over time and included a lot more than just the familiar sarsen ring and trilithons. English Heritage have an interactive map which allows you to look around the site … Continue reading

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Archaeological interpretation needs to include knowledge systems

I am not denying that ancient people, like many modern people, believed in lots of superstitions. What I am arguing as loudly as I can is that they wouldn’t have survived without a massive store of practical information. All my … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, cult sites, indigenous memory systems, Israel, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, Memory Spaces, orality, primary orality, ritual sites | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Primary orality – what is it?

‘Primary orality’ is all about the way societies communicate and store information when they have no contact whatsoever with writing. If they don’t have literacy, they do have orality. Orality is an information technology, a tool which increases the ability of humans to store … Continue reading

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Stone circles in Jordan – are they memory spaces?

Thank you to all the people who have pointed me to this news story on LiveScience and asked my opinion about whether they are memory spaces in the way I believe the British circles to be. [click on the image for the … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Jordan, Memory Spaces, Nasca lines, stone circles | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why rituals and belief? Why not knowledge?

I guess this is going to be my hobby horse over the next few years: Why are enigmatic objects always associated with ‘beliefs’ and nebulous ‘rituals’? Why not knowledge? Past Horizons is an archaeological journal often reporting very interesting finds. … Continue reading

Posted in archaeoastronomy, archaeology, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, primary orality | 2 Comments

A conspiracy of archaeologists? I don’t think so.

Is this stone final proof of a world wide prehistoric culture? Apparently there is an established archaeological community which ignores the results. I simply can’t believe in a world wide conspiracy of archaeologists who oppose new ideas. I have good evidence that there … Continue reading

Posted in archaeologists, archaeology, conspiracy theories, memory, Memory Spaces, mnemonics, orality | 2 Comments