Category Archives: mnemonics

Monuments for memory – the Ten Indicators

My theory about the purpose of many ancient monuments argues that they were built primarily as memory spaces. Their design was specifically to enable elders to practice their memorisation, to teach it and to perform the knowledge for the community according … Continue reading

Posted in Cambridge University Press, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, lukasa, memory devices, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mnemonics, primary orality, stone circles, Stonehenge, Ten Indicators, The Memory Code, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

The Memory Code

2016 is to be a big year. My next book, The Memory Code, is the culmination of eight years of intense work. To feel that I had the authority to make the claim that I have a new theory for the … Continue reading

Posted in Allen & Unwin, archaeology, art of memory, Chaco Canyon, Easter Island, indigenous memory systems, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, mnemonics, Nasca lines, Stonehenge, The Memory Code | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Memory Code

Stonehenge – they moved their memory palace from Wales!

Thank you to the many people who sent me links to the various reports of this discovery and commented on how wonderfully it suited my theory on the purpose of Stonehenge. “Stonehenge was a Welsh monument from its very beginning. … Continue reading

Posted in archaeologists, archaeology, art of memory, Australian Aboriginal, British Neolithic, Cambridge University Press, indigenous memory systems, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, memory devices, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mnemonics, songlines, Stonehenge | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My 130 Ancestors

I received this comment on the My Books page today: I’ve seen you over at the mnemotechnics forum. I wonder if there is a place where you’ve listed your 52 ‘ancestors’ for playing cards? I love the idea of my 52 characters … Continue reading

Posted in art of memory, memory, memory devices, Memory Spaces, mnemonics | 4 Comments

Speaking about orality – it’s all about memory

I have now finished all the speaking engagements for the year. I am delighted with all the new friends and the wonderful feedback. The video of my talk in Brisbane last weekend should be on YouTube soon. Although people were … Continue reading

Posted in Cambridge University Press, indigenous memory systems, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, memory, memory devices, mnemonics, orality, prehistory, primary orality, Stonehenge | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The advance copies arrive

The wonderful moment when I first hold the book which represents years of obsessive pleasure. Thank you to LaTrobe University, my PhD supervisor Professor Sue Martin, Cambridge University Press, family, friends and most of all, my husband, Damian. All that … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Cambridge University Press, carved stone balls, indigenous memory systems, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, memory, mnemonics, Poverty Point, primary orality, stone circles, Stonehenge, writing non-fiction | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Primary orality and portable objects

I am presenting a paper, Primary orality and portable objects, at the Archaeology of Portable Art conference at the Australian National University in Canberra, 23rd – 24th May 2015. The program looks fantastic – Click on the above image or here. I’ll … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Australian Aboriginal, carved stone balls, indigenous memory systems, Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies, Memory Spaces, mnemonics, orality, primary orality, Stonehenge | Tagged | 2 Comments

Orality – why it is so important for prehistoric archaeologists

Primary orality is what you have when you don’t have literacy. It is often commented that prehistoric cultures didn’t leave a written record. What is almost never mentioned is that cultures which had no contact with writing did have an alternative. They had … Continue reading

Posted in archaeologists, archaeology, Australian Aboriginal, indigenous memory systems, lukasa, memory, Memory Spaces, mnemonics, mythology, orality, prehistory, primary orality, Yolngu | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Singing the knowledge – Yanyuwa kujika

A wonderful collaboration between the Yanyuwa people and Monash University is online and enables us to glimpse the singing tracks of their culture. The Yanyuwa live 0n the Gulf Carpentaria in Northern Australia. Animations of the songs can be seen at the … Continue reading

Posted in art of memory, Australian Aboriginal, kajika, Memory Spaces, method of loci, mnemonics, orality, primary orality, Yanuwa | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment